7200rpm vs 5600 rpm

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clueluzz
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Joined: Sep 7 2002

I'm eyeing the LaCie d2 160GB Firewire drive.
http://www.lacie.com/products/product.cfm?id=80447870-8517-11D6-98100090278D3ED0

However, the specs says it's only 5600rpm. The 120GB version runs at 7200rpm. Has anyone experienced video underruns using the 160GB Firewire drive?

-Robin

Charisma Productions
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Joined: Nov 22 2001

get the 7,200rpm....on a large capacity drive it is the best option, 5,400 are ok for boot drives but for video a 7,200rpm is much better...

Keitht
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Joined: Jan 8 2001

What sustained transfer speed is required for problem free DV editing? Is that figure not more important than simple RPM?

------------------
Regards

Keith

Regards Keith

Unicorn
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Joined: Apr 12 1999

Sustained speed is 3.6MB/second, but I'd say you want at least 10MB/second to be safe. Personally I edit with 5400rpm drives and see few problems... occasionally I have to defrag to avoid dropped frames, but not that often.

Of course, if the video editing companies would actually write their software to buffer up 30 seconds or more of video in RAM to cover for any slow spots on the disk, there'd be no need to worry about any of this...

P4-3.06/2GB RAM/2500GB IDE/SATA. Avid Media Composer, Liquid Edition, Premiere 6, Lightwave, Vue 6, eyeon Fusion 5. DV and HDV editing/compositing.

cstv
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Joined: Jul 26 2002

i almost bought mator's 5400rpm firewire drive a while ago and fortunately dabs took too long so i canceled it and ordered the 7200rpm instead. Even with the extra speed i still have problems with it because it's quite full and i can't defrag it for some reason, in fact right now it's not working at all and maxtor still haven't replied... anyway, for large video drives it's almost always better to go for the 7200rpm because you want the datarate as high as possible.

royston2000
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Joined: Jun 8 1999

I have three 40gb 5400 drives on a Raptor based system. No problems WHASTSOEVER.

archibald studios

g3vbl
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Joined: Sep 9 2000

Rotational speed is only one of several factors which determine the rate at which data can be transferred. Modern 5400 rpm drives don't even break sweat.

johnpr98
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Joined: Aug 20 1999

I have the trusty ADS Pyro, I only recently upgraded with a 7200 rpm boot drive, all my other drives are 5400 rpm IDE internal or in external ADS Fire drive or USB 2 enclosures.

My question , what is a dropped frame?

Regards

John
http://www.johnpr98.com

johnpr98
 
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cstv
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Joined: Jul 26 2002

g3vbl's right, there are other factors. You're best bet is to find someone (PC magazine or a google search) that's done a test of the drives you're looking at. Find out what the actual datarate is, read and write.

Don't believe the specs on the side of the box because these are often theoretical (LaCie probably suggest an amazing 50MBps... in practice? i think not)

Keitht
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Joined: Jan 8 2001

Does high spindle speed also tend to mean higher temperatures and therefore potential need for additional cooling?

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Keith

Regards Keith

g3vbl
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Joined: Sep 9 2000

Higher spindle speeds tend to generate more heat and also more noise, though this is a generalisation. I prefer to have things run cool for reliability reasons so I have lots of fans in the case (7 as I recall) and put up with the noise. I have a pair of fans drawing air directly across my drives. This is probably paranoia

Reviews on the various hardware sites examine both these issues when they test drives.

steve
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Joined: Apr 8 1999

I agree with g3vbl, forget 7200 rpm drives if you are doing normal DV work. I have used Maxtor 5400 rpm drives for the last 5 years on NLE. The last 3 have been with DV using a Pyro card.
With DMA enabled, read & write data rates have always been greater than 10MB/s even on the inner partitions. The benefit of a higher data rate is frequently masked by other issues, eg background programs, fragmentation, poor driver setup, VIA chipsets etc.
Amongst other drives, I am currently running 2 80GB maxtor 5400 drives on NFTS. One is on an IDE interface, the other is in a firewire box. The internal drive has 3 partitions, the R/W rates vary between 30 & 19 MB/s. The external drive's 3 partitions' R/W rates vary between 29 & 20 MB/s.
Interestingly, the firewire drive has a much lower processor hit, and I can simultaneously stream a DV file from it and write an MPEG2 to it across a 100 base t network (separate source and destination workstations) without dropped frames on either.

bcrabtree
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Joined: Mar 7 1999

quote:Originally posted by Charisma Productions:
get the 7,200rpm....on a large capacity drive it is the best option, 5,400 are ok for boot drives but for video a 7,200rpm is much better...

TOTALLY disagree.

I'd ALWAYS go for 7,200rpm for a boot drive, because it can make a BIG difference in the performance of the PC - speeding up the operating system and programs.

Conversely, I'd usually be happy with a 5,400rpm drive for most editing tasks, because the performance difference may not be noticed. And here, remember, a lot of people are now editing via standard FireWire ports (or CardBus FireWire cards) on laptops fitted with 4,200rpm hard disk drives.

That said, in an ideal world, I'd use 7,200rpm for both - and, with standard IDE drives, the price difference is often so small, that it's worth paying out that little bit extra, just in case. Clearly, though, this situation is not the one that Robin is seeing with FireWire drives.

Bob C