One Tx & 2 Rx

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Martin B
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Joined: Aug 16 2000

A question for John Willet please.

In a posting under the Weddings forum you said You must have a separate receiver for every transmitter used.

You cannot have two transmitters on the same frequency feeding one receiver - the transmitters will fight with each other.

My question is can you have two receivers working to one transmitter?

I'm thinking of a situation where the venue provides a hand held radio mic into the PA system for the top table speakers. I normally use a stand mounted K6/ME66 with the ew101-p and end up with a mix of live sound and that of the venues PA speakers. I make sure to avoid interferring frequencies but if I could just tune to the venues freq. I could capture some ambient sound from nearer the centre of the room and mix the two later.

Would welcome your advice before I try to set it up please.

Martin

Martin

John Willett at Home
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Joined: Jun 29 2001

quote:Originally posted by Martin B:
My question is can you have two receivers working to one transmitter?

The answer is yes, and no.

You can normally have as many receivers as you want with a single transmitter - no problem - it's the same way that broadcast radio and TV works.

However...

The transmitters and receivers have to be compatible with each other.

Many modern radio systems use noise reduction systems to give better quality - therefore the receivers need to be compatible with the transmitters.

You can use any Sennheiser evolution receiver with any evolution transmitter (they all use HDX noise reduction) but you should not use an evolution transmitter/receiver with a series 1000, 3000 or 5000, as these use HiDynPLUS noise reduction.

The same thing follows using transmitters and receivers of different manufacturers.

The problem comes with the transmitter compressing the signal in one way and the receiver re-expanding it in another.

The only way this may work OK is with the cheapest and lowest quality systems that do not use any noise reduction at all.

If you are not so bothered with quality - it may be OK – you will just have to try it and see.

Sorry if this is not such a simple answer.

John

DAVE M
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Joined: May 17 1999

we bought 1 radio mic, one line transmitter and 2 body type receivers from Tantec and the system was ok.
It meant that either a solo artist or a mixdown could be sent to two free running cameras.

They've been shelved to use a senh. single RX/TX system.

I prefer to use a cabled audio distribution system where possible. there's less chance of trouble.
I use EMO splitters which give mic/line through and also give 2 extra feeds.
Earth lift and phantom is possible.

John Willett at Home
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Joined: Jun 29 2001

Yes - same manufacturer and type OK, no problem.

The problems occur when you mix different types of noise-reduction system.

John

RayL
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Joined: Mar 31 1999

There are real advantages to having alternate transmitters for a single receiver - providing you have full control over what is turned on at any one time.

Example - a 'Christmas Extravaganza' at a local church last week. Small budget so I took down a single radio mic set which has a radio hand mic and a body pack on the same frequency. The body pack can use either a t/c mic or a headset. Mark up the script to allocate one transmitter or the other to successive performers and make sure that only one is turned on at any one time. Minimum of gear to be transported and set up and everybody happy.

Ray Liffen

John Willett at Home
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Joined: Jun 29 2001

Absolutely - but safer to have the two transmitters on different frequencies and change the frequency of the receiver when swapping from one to the other - just in case...

John

Martin B
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Joined: Aug 16 2000

Apologies for delayed reply, been out for a couple of days.

Many thanks for advice and info. Quality is important so it looks like I stick with plan A unless I find an evolution system in place.

Happy Xmas all.

Martin

Martin