SUMOdisc 500gb HDD Problem

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ZombieTrev
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Joined: Feb 26 2009

Hey guys and girls,

I just recently (accidentally) plugged my SUMOdisc 500gb HDD into the power cable for my spare PC monitor. The 2 cables have the same connector so without thinking, I just plugged it in...

Now when I turn the HDD on, the power light comes on but the HDD doesn't seem to start up (it makes no noise, doesn't vibrate and doesn't connect to PC). I'm guessing the voltage was too high on the monitor power cable and I've blown something but I'm not very tech minded...

My q really is, does anyone know whether or not the data on the HDD or ideally, the HDD itself, is salvageable? There are some very important files on there...

Many thanks,

Trevor

Alan Roberts
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Joined: May 3 1999

I would guess that the monitor power supply is vastly higher in voltage than the disk, so something in the hard drive package has been killed. I very much doubt that the drive itself is damaged. Is is a bare drive or in a powered casing. If it's bare, you probably have killed it, but if it's a fee-standing box, it could well be perfectly ok if swapped out to another casing.

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ZombieTrev
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Joined: Feb 26 2009

Hi Alan,

It is in a casing. Here is a pic and the specs...

http://www.play.com/PC/PCs/4-/5675114/SUMOdisk-500GB-3-5-External-USB-2-0-Hard-Drive/Product.html

I thought it may be similar to what you suggested so I took the HDD out of the casing and attached it via sata cable to the inside of my comp but it still refused to power up... I fear this means it is dead... am I correct in this assumption?

Trevor

Alan Roberts
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Joined: May 3 1999

That does sound very terminal to me. There are some clever people around who might be able to resurrect it and rescue the data though, but I don't have any contacts.

Get my test cards document, and cards for 625, 525, 720 and 1080. Thanks to Gavin Gration for hosting them.
Camera settings documents are held by Daniel Browning and at the EBU
My book, 'Circles of Confusion' is available here.
Also EBU Tech.3335 tells how to test cameras, and R.118 tells how to use the results.

steve
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Joined: Apr 8 1999

Did the powwer supplies have a single coax connector of a 4 pole mini-DIN plug like a PS2 mouse? A few years ago, I destroyed a perfectly good Icy Box external IDE drive case, (even to the extent of something inside smelling of burning). The cause of the problem was that not all external drive power supplies have the +5V & +12V supplies connected to the same pins on the connector. You can imagine the effect of powering up the 5V interface circuits with +12V, but the 12V drive motor didn't worry about the +5V. The drive survived, but it was death to the case.

Steve

Gavin Gration
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Joined: Jul 29 1999
ZombieTrev wrote:
Hi Alan,

It is in a casing. Here is a pic and the specs...

http://www.play.com/PC/PCs/4-/5675114/SUMOdisk-500GB-3-5-External-USB-2-0-Hard-Drive/Product.html

I thought it may be similar to what you suggested so I took the HDD out of the casing and attached it via sata cable to the inside of my comp but it still refused to power up... I fear this means it is dead... am I correct in this assumption?

Trevor

SATA is the data connection - Did you also connect a power cable to the drive?

SUMO drives have fairly standard external switch-mode PSUs. We have some of the 500GB units. With luck you have probably just blown the controller - the data might be OK.

DAVE M
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Joined: May 17 1999

I have a lot of "wall wart" type PSUs that can easily be confused so use a paint marker - like a felt pen but it writes with white (or whatever) paint.

It's also useful for plugtops to label what does what and I use it to id batteries.